Thursday, April 5, 2012
By Michael Layman

To see more comics by Michael, or anything else from The Louisville Cardinal, click here.

By Michael Layman

To see more comics by Michael, or anything else from The Louisville Cardinal, click here.

Comic No. 7By Michael Layman

To see more comics by Michael, or anything else from The Louisville Cardinal, click here.

Comic No. 7
By Michael Layman

To see more comics by Michael, or anything else from The Louisville Cardinal, click here.

Comic No. 6By Michael Layman

To see more comics by Michael, or anything else from The Louisville Cardinal, click here.

Comic No. 6
By Michael Layman

To see more comics by Michael, or anything else from The Louisville Cardinal, click here.

Wednesday, April 4, 2012

Comic No. 5By Michael Layman


To see more comics by Michael, or anything else from The Louisville Cardinal, click here.

Comic No. 5
By Michael Layman

To see more comics by Michael, or anything else from The Louisville Cardinal, click here.


Comic No. 4By Michael Layman


To see more comics by Michael, or anything else from The Louisville Cardinal, click here.

Comic No. 4
By Michael Layman

To see more comics by Michael, or anything else from The Louisville Cardinal, click here.

Comic No. 3By Michael Layman

To see more comics by Michael, or anything else from The Louisville Cardinal, click here.

Comic No. 3
By Michael Layman

To see more comics by Michael, or anything else from The Louisville Cardinal, click here.


Comic No. 2By Michael Layman
To see more comics by Michael, or anything else from The Louisville Cardinal, click here.

Comic No. 2
By Michael Layman

To see more comics by Michael, or anything else from The Louisville Cardinal, click here.

Tuesday, April 3, 2012




The Green Leaf Vegetarian Bistro serves food on styrofoam plates, a fact which belies their eco-friendly atmosphere.(Photo: Nathan Douglas/The Louisville Cardinal)

The Green Leaf Natural Vegetarian Bistro: Green? Leafy?
By Nathan Douglas

The United States is a very food illiterate country. Essentially, a majority of the population does not know what they are eating or how to prepare reasonable food. I say food here referencing real food, not a concoction of pink slime and enriched white flour.
I don’t wish to ever speak badly of any new, local enterprise, and will rarely do so, however I feel like this is a special occasion. The Green Leaf Natural Vegetarian Bistro, which is a part of the chain of eateries along West Cardinal Boulevard, is an apparent attempt to simply capitalize on the faux side of the health craze, or whatever you wish to call it, that is sweeping the nation.
Green Leaf boasts popular buzzwords like “healthy,” “fresh” and “natural,” and is not discreet in their usage. This was the first alarming aspect of the restaurant. In my opinion, if a restaurant has to publicize these things in such a flamboyant manner, there are obviously some insecurities present about the food they are serving, or at least it makes one skeptical…




To read the complete article, click here.

The Green Leaf Vegetarian Bistro serves food on styrofoam plates, a fact which belies their eco-friendly atmosphere.
(Photo: Nathan Douglas/The Louisville Cardinal)


The Green Leaf Natural Vegetarian Bistro: Green? Leafy?

By Nathan Douglas

The United States is a very food illiterate country. Essentially, a majority of the population does not know what they are eating or how to prepare reasonable food. I say food here referencing real food, not a concoction of pink slime and enriched white flour.

I don’t wish to ever speak badly of any new, local enterprise, and will rarely do so, however I feel like this is a special occasion. The Green Leaf Natural Vegetarian Bistro, which is a part of the chain of eateries along West Cardinal Boulevard, is an apparent attempt to simply capitalize on the faux side of the health craze, or whatever you wish to call it, that is sweeping the nation.

Green Leaf boasts popular buzzwords like “healthy,” “fresh” and “natural,” and is not discreet in their usage. This was the first alarming aspect of the restaurant. In my opinion, if a restaurant has to publicize these things in such a flamboyant manner, there are obviously some insecurities present about the food they are serving, or at least it makes one skeptical…

To read the complete article, click here.

Monday, April 2, 2012



Cardinal fans gathered to welcome the basketball home from their Florida win. (Photo: Nathan Gardner/The Louisville Cardinal)

Cards fans ‘go nuts’ over Florida win
By Baylee Pulliam and James El-Mallakh
The Cardinals advanced to the NCAA Final Four, after a 72:68 comeback against the University of Florida Gators on Saturday. And fans in Louisville let the world know it, with wild street celebrations long into the night.
Kelly Byrd and Holly Babcock didn’t watch the game – they’re devoted University of Kentucky fans. But they say U of L’s win was impossible to ignore.
“It was like the whole place erupted,” said Byrd, a freshman undecided major.
From the view from her balcony on Sunday morning, the Province looked mostly deserted. “People are probably recovering,” she said.
Babcock, also a freshman undecided major, said she spent the greater part of her night listening to her neighbors cheering and honking their car horns. “The whole place just went nuts,” she said. “People just flooded out into the parking lot and stayed there for hours.”
Both Byrd and Babcock said they were more excited about Sunday’s Baylor versus UK match up.



To read the complete article, click here.

Cardinal fans gathered to welcome the basketball home from their Florida win. 
(Photo: Nathan Gardner/The Louisville Cardinal)


Cards fans ‘go nuts’ over Florida win

By Baylee Pulliam and James El-Mallakh

The Cardinals advanced to the NCAA Final Four, after a 72:68 comeback against the University of Florida Gators on Saturday. And fans in Louisville let the world know it, with wild street celebrations long into the night.

Kelly Byrd and Holly Babcock didn’t watch the game – they’re devoted University of Kentucky fans. But they say U of L’s win was impossible to ignore.

“It was like the whole place erupted,” said Byrd, a freshman undecided major.

From the view from her balcony on Sunday morning, the Province looked mostly deserted. “People are probably recovering,” she said.

Babcock, also a freshman undecided major, said she spent the greater part of her night listening to her neighbors cheering and honking their car horns. “The whole place just went nuts,” she said. “People just flooded out into the parking lot and stayed there for hours.”

Both Byrd and Babcock said they were more excited about Sunday’s Baylor versus UK match up.

To read the complete article, click here.




(Photo/Flickr: courtesy of chrissatchwell)

Energy conservation competition at U of L
By Caitlyn Crenshaw
Turn off the lights. The U of L Sustainability Council is encouraging all students and staff to conserve energy resources in an effort to create a more sustainable U of L.  Campus Conservation Nationals, which includes over 150 campuses, is, “the first nationwide electricity reduction competition on university campuses,” according to Dr. Justin Mog, assistant to the Provost for Sustainability Initiatives.
“This competition is designed to empower the future generation of energy and environmental leaders,” said Mog.  The competition is one aspect of the council’s programs promoting conservation and awareness.
In addition to the national competition, March 26 through April 15 marks “Bluegrass Unplugged,” U of L’s competition in its first conservation competition versus the University of Kentucky to reduce the amount of energy used in campus buildings.  Mog said the goal is “to achieve the greatest possible energy reductions in 12 residence halls.”
The CCN competition occurs for several weeks. However, many of the council’s initiatives are completed year round to challenge the campus on a daily basis.  Barbara Burns is a part of a team teaching a psychology course, “Mindfulness and sustainability.”  The course focuses on “sustainability, energy conservation and the psychology of decision making and behavior change,” said Burns, the Sustainability Education & Research Committee Chair.
U of L housing is helping to lead awareness outside of the classroom.  Taylor McGovern U’Sellis, residence life coordinator, said, “We want to raise awareness about how easy it is to reduce your impact on the environment by turning off a light or taking a shorter shower.”
Thursday, March 29 marks the Campus Conservation Nationals kick-off when the U of L RSO GRASS will be showing two documentaries about the “highly unsustainable nature of our current energy use.” The kickoff will be from 7:30 pm to 10 pm in the Chao Auditorium.
The competition hopes to promote not only awareness of energy conservation, but also action to create a more sustainable campus, state and nation.  Mog said that “to save one gigawatt of electricity is enough to shut down a massive coal-fired power plant for four hours.”
To read more from the Louisville Cardinal, click here.


(Photo/Flickr: courtesy of chrissatchwell)


Energy conservation competition at U of L

By Caitlyn Crenshaw

Turn off the lights. The U of L Sustainability Council is encouraging all students and staff to conserve energy resources in an effort to create a more sustainable U of L.  Campus Conservation Nationals, which includes over 150 campuses, is, “the first nationwide electricity reduction competition on university campuses,” according to Dr. Justin Mog, assistant to the Provost for Sustainability Initiatives.

“This competition is designed to empower the future generation of energy and environmental leaders,” said Mog.  The competition is one aspect of the council’s programs promoting conservation and awareness.

In addition to the national competition, March 26 through April 15 marks “Bluegrass Unplugged,” U of L’s competition in its first conservation competition versus the University of Kentucky to reduce the amount of energy used in campus buildings.  Mog said the goal is “to achieve the greatest possible energy reductions in 12 residence halls.”

The CCN competition occurs for several weeks. However, many of the council’s initiatives are completed year round to challenge the campus on a daily basis.  Barbara Burns is a part of a team teaching a psychology course, “Mindfulness and sustainability.”  The course focuses on “sustainability, energy conservation and the psychology of decision making and behavior change,” said Burns, the Sustainability Education & Research Committee Chair.

U of L housing is helping to lead awareness outside of the classroom.  Taylor McGovern U’Sellis, residence life coordinator, said, “We want to raise awareness about how easy it is to reduce your impact on the environment by turning off a light or taking a shorter shower.”

Thursday, March 29 marks the Campus Conservation Nationals kick-off when the U of L RSO GRASS will be showing two documentaries about the “highly unsustainable nature of our current energy use.” The kickoff will be from 7:30 pm to 10 pm in the Chao Auditorium.

The competition hopes to promote not only awareness of energy conservation, but also action to create a more sustainable campus, state and nation.  Mog said that “to save one gigawatt of electricity is enough to shut down a massive coal-fired power plant for four hours.”

To read more from the Louisville Cardinal, click here.




For college students, graduation day is the culmination of collegiate success.(Photo: courtesy of the University of Louisville)

Number of U.S. degree holders reaches a record high of 30 percent
By Ian Wooldridge
According to recent data released by the 2011 U.S. Census Bureau, over 30 percent of American adults age 25 or older now hold bachelor’s degrees or have attained some level of higher education.
That is the equivalent of approximately 61 million Americans. This new milestone could have college students excited about the possibility of continuing a very important trend and can serve as motivation to continue to work toward their educational goals and dreams.
The data also shows numerous gaps among the different groups that make up the approximate 61 million bachelor’s degree holders. According to an Inside Higher Ed observation, 50 percent of Asians in America 25 years or older reported having a bachelor’s degree or higher in 2011, as well as 34 percent of Caucasians, 20 percent of black people and 14 percent of Latino Americans. The New York Times observed that there were “significant gains in all demographic groups, but blacks and Latinos not only trail far behind Caucasians, the gap has also widened in the last decade.”
Inside Higher Ed also reports that of the approximate 61 million degree-holders, 30 million are men and 31 million are women. The number of women with bachelor’s degrees increased 37 percent in the last decade, while the increase for men was 23 percent. The U.S. Census Bureau shows in the new “Field of Bachelor’s Degree in the United States: 2009” report, issued in February 2012, that of the approximate 61 million people holding a bachelor’s degree or higher, close to 21 million of them held a degree in a science or engineering field.
The U.S. Census Bureau also shows in another recent report, “Educational Attainment in the United States: 2009”, issued in February 2012, that bachelor’s degree-holders suffered significantly lower rates of unemployment than those with less education during every month from January 2008 to December 2010….
To read the complete article, click here.

For college students, graduation day is the culmination of collegiate success.
(Photo: courtesy of the University of Louisville)


Number of U.S. degree holders reaches a record high of 30 percent

By Ian Wooldridge

According to recent data released by the 2011 U.S. Census Bureau, over 30 percent of American adults age 25 or older now hold bachelor’s degrees or have attained some level of higher education.

That is the equivalent of approximately 61 million Americans. This new milestone could have college students excited about the possibility of continuing a very important trend and can serve as motivation to continue to work toward their educational goals and dreams.

The data also shows numerous gaps among the different groups that make up the approximate 61 million bachelor’s degree holders. According to an Inside Higher Ed observation, 50 percent of Asians in America 25 years or older reported having a bachelor’s degree or higher in 2011, as well as 34 percent of Caucasians, 20 percent of black people and 14 percent of Latino Americans. The New York Times observed that there were “significant gains in all demographic groups, but blacks and Latinos not only trail far behind Caucasians, the gap has also widened in the last decade.”

Inside Higher Ed also reports that of the approximate 61 million degree-holders, 30 million are men and 31 million are women. The number of women with bachelor’s degrees increased 37 percent in the last decade, while the increase for men was 23 percent. The U.S. Census Bureau shows in the new “Field of Bachelor’s Degree in the United States: 2009” report, issued in February 2012, that of the approximate 61 million people holding a bachelor’s degree or higher, close to 21 million of them held a degree in a science or engineering field.

The U.S. Census Bureau also shows in another recent report, “Educational Attainment in the United States: 2009”, issued in February 2012, that bachelor’s degree-holders suffered significantly lower rates of unemployment than those with less education during every month from January 2008 to December 2010….

To read the complete article, click here.


With the spread of technology, people can walk around with their phones, iPods and mp3 players, allowing them to create their own soundtrack to the day.(Photo/Flickr: Courtesy of pauldesu.com)




Stop, look, don’t listen: wearers of earbuds are more at risk on the road
By Baylee Pulliam
FRANKFORT – A sense of resignation permeated the 2012 budget conversation at the Capitol this week. With Thursday’s passage of House Bill 265, a bill guided by Gov. Steve Beshear’s proposed budget, through the House of Representatives, the University of Louisville finds itself at a legislative halfway mark in the path to a 6.4 percent overall funding reduction in 2013.
HB 265, sponsored by House Appropriations and Revenue committee chair Rick Rand, D-Bedford, passed out of committee on Wednesday with the only vocal opposition coming from Rep. Alicia Webb-Edgington, R-Fort Wright, and Rep. Jim Wayne, D-Louisville.
Wayne’s commentary reflected the concerns that have been expressed by much of U of L’s student body and leadership, saying “We have serious systemic problems, and when we vote for a budget like this, it means we’re in denial,” adding, “It shoves the problem off to students,”
Wayne remained in opposition to the bill as it reached and ultimately passed the House floor, insisting that most legislators had not thoroughly examined the bill…
To read more from the Louisville Cardinal, click here.

With the spread of technology, people can walk around with their phones, iPods and mp3 players, allowing them to create their own soundtrack to the day.
(Photo/Flickr: Courtesy of pauldesu.com)


Stop, look, don’t listen: wearers of earbuds are more at risk on the road

By Baylee Pulliam

FRANKFORT – A sense of resignation permeated the 2012 budget conversation at the Capitol this week. With Thursday’s passage of House Bill 265, a bill guided by Gov. Steve Beshear’s proposed budget, through the House of Representatives, the University of Louisville finds itself at a legislative halfway mark in the path to a 6.4 percent overall funding reduction in 2013.

HB 265, sponsored by House Appropriations and Revenue committee chair Rick Rand, D-Bedford, passed out of committee on Wednesday with the only vocal opposition coming from Rep. Alicia Webb-Edgington, R-Fort Wright, and Rep. Jim Wayne, D-Louisville.

Wayne’s commentary reflected the concerns that have been expressed by much of U of L’s student body and leadership, saying “We have serious systemic problems, and when we vote for a budget like this, it means we’re in denial,” adding, “It shoves the problem off to students,”

Wayne remained in opposition to the bill as it reached and ultimately passed the House floor, insisting that most legislators had not thoroughly examined the bill…

To read more from the Louisville Cardinal, click here.

Sunday, April 1, 2012
The Kentucky Capitol, located in Frankfort, KY.(Photo: Courtesy of ky.gov)




6.4 percent cut to higher education passes House, heads to Senate
By Rae Hodge
FRANKFORT – A sense of resignation permeated the 2012 budget conversation at the Capitol this week. With Thursday’s passage of House Bill 265, a bill guided by Gov. Steve Beshear’s proposed budget, through the House of Representatives, the University of Louisville finds itself at a legislative halfway mark in the path to a 6.4 percent overall funding reduction in 2013.
HB 265, sponsored by House Appropriations and Revenue committee chair Rick Rand, D-Bedford, passed out of committee on Wednesday with the only vocal opposition coming from Rep. Alicia Webb-Edgington, R-Fort Wright, and Rep. Jim Wayne, D-Louisville.
Wayne’s commentary reflected the concerns that have been expressed by much of U of L’s student body and leadership, saying “We have serious systemic problems, and when we vote for a budget like this, it means we’re in denial,” adding, “It shoves the problem off to students,”
Wayne remained in opposition to the bill as it reached and ultimately passed the House floor, insisting that most legislators had not thoroughly examined the bill…
To read the complete article, click here.

The Kentucky Capitol, located in Frankfort, KY.
(Photo: Courtesy of ky.gov)


6.4 percent cut to higher education passes House, heads to Senate

By Rae Hodge

FRANKFORT – A sense of resignation permeated the 2012 budget conversation at the Capitol this week. With Thursday’s passage of House Bill 265, a bill guided by Gov. Steve Beshear’s proposed budget, through the House of Representatives, the University of Louisville finds itself at a legislative halfway mark in the path to a 6.4 percent overall funding reduction in 2013.

HB 265, sponsored by House Appropriations and Revenue committee chair Rick Rand, D-Bedford, passed out of committee on Wednesday with the only vocal opposition coming from Rep. Alicia Webb-Edgington, R-Fort Wright, and Rep. Jim Wayne, D-Louisville.

Wayne’s commentary reflected the concerns that have been expressed by much of U of L’s student body and leadership, saying “We have serious systemic problems, and when we vote for a budget like this, it means we’re in denial,” adding, “It shoves the problem off to students,”

Wayne remained in opposition to the bill as it reached and ultimately passed the House floor, insisting that most legislators had not thoroughly examined the bill…

To read the complete article, click here.